Volume- 4, Issue-1, January 2022

 
 

1. A Comparative Study of Fairy Tales by Charles Perrault, Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen along with their On-Screen Adaptations through a Feminist Perspective

Ayush V. Kurian, Department of Modern European Languages, Gautam Buddha University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh.

Abstract

The Research Paper entitled “A Comparative Study of Fairy Tales by Charles Perrault, Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen along with their On-Screen Adaptations through a Feminist Perspective” deals with the detailed study of adaptive works and it analyses the changes incorporated in it with respect to the feminist perspective. It specifically focuses on the adaptive works and the changes undergone with the current socio-political situation. The works in question are produced by Walt Disney to include the balance towards a particular audience. The movies are namely ‘Tangled’, ‘Maleficent’, ‘Cinderella’ and ‘Frozen’. This paper looks to aim at these popular Disney movies adapted from famous writers like Hans Christian Anderson, Brother Grimm’s and Charles Perrault. The evolution of the adaptive work by enumerating both the pros and cons would bring forth the holistic view of how an adaptation should not be viewed as a merely copied version as it adds value to the original source material as well. The feminist study will help us understand the differences in the thought process of woman characters are written now and also shed light on how feminist movements has had a huge role in the present popular media.

Keywords: Adaptation, Linda Hutcherson, Grimm Brothers, Disney movies, Cinderella, Maleficent, Frozen, Tangled, Feminism, Marxism, Fairy-tale.

Download PDF

 

2. Caste and Gender in Meena Kandasamy’s The Gypsy Goddess

Kahul Siva TejaaResearch Scholar, Osmania University, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Hyderabad.
Dasari SashankarGuest Faculty of English, Nagarjuna Government College (A), Nalgonda,


Abstract

Meena Kandasamy’s first novel, The Gypsy Goddess, is an experimental novel that takes inspiration from the Kilvenmani massacre to depict the struggle, plight, and injustice meted on a group of Dalit agricultural labourers. The novel through its radical postmodern structure tries to confront the dynamics of caste and gender in Indian society. This paper argues that the novel beginning from the title itself gives a pivotal position to women and Dalit women in particular. It attempts to discuss the problems, struggles, and spirit of Dalit women in the novel which are specific to Dalit women and which are marginalized by mainstream feminist movements. This paper believes that though the novel fundamentally opposes the nexus between the state and upper caste landlords and bats for communism, it also complicates the relationship between class struggle and caste questions in India. Therefore, this paper by analyzing The Gypsy Goddess wants to emphasize the necessity of discussion regarding the workings of caste and gender among Indians and Dalits in particular.

Keywords: Meena Kandasamy, Postmodern Fiction, Caste, Dalit Feminism, Class Struggle.

Download PDF

 

3. Essentialized Ethnicity - A Tool of Anti-Assimilationist Politics? A Probe into the Veracity of Cultural Hybridity through the Exploration of Hanif Kureishi's 'The Buddha of Suburbia' and M.G.Vassanji's 'The Gunny Sack'

Purbali SenguptaInternational School of Hospitality Management.


Abstract

Those embroiled in favour of Multiculturalism often face a sharp critique: Isn't Multiculturalism under constructed categories like cultural diversity and integrity, a fiction that cleverly masks socio-eco-pol inequalities faced by migrants with a history of Colonization? This paper explores immigrant experience in rapidly changing multi-ethnic societies with two specific texts under the radar: Hanif Kureishi's 'The Buddha of Suburbia' (1990) and M.G. Vassanji's 'The Gunny Sack' (1989). It attempts to designate 'Buddha' and the 'Gunny sack' as signifiers (sites/spaces) of cultural hybridity and heterogeneity that can counter/refute any fetishized idea of a pure and monolithic cultural identity. The paper challenges the clichéd opposition between Nativism and Assimilation that is often played out through the trope of a generational feud in diasporic societies. It also raises an unsettling focus on Sexism, underpinning hybrid societies; and evaluates Double Colonization and Gender issues that are often side-tracked in the context of such immigrant experience.

Keywords: Hanif Kureishi, M.G. Vassanji, Multiculturalism, Heterogeneity, Sexism.

Download PDF

 

4. Loss and Hope in the Pandemic Condition of The Scarlet Plague by Jack London

Dr R. Ravindran, Assistant Professor, Department of English, K. Ramakrishnan College of Engineering, Samayapuram, Trichy.
Dr T. K. Vedharaja, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Alagappa Govt. Arts College, Karaikudi.


Abstract

This paper discusses two phenomenal things of human beings. i.e hope and loss. Loss in life is always inevitable, so the hope. The more one has hope, the more he can postpone his loss. Time is a precious one. Hence one should not lament the loss. He should immediately react to it in a positive way. He should encourage his hopeful nature to step forward. Both the world and life have uncertainty as Covid-19 has shown the uncertainty of life. Literature is not the mere representation of society; sometimes it shows, teaches or educates people to live happily. On that stance, epidemic literature has been done great works or miracles in giving people hope during and after the pandemic time. Now the whole world suffered from Covid-19. Jack London is one of the famous writers who had written different themes. His “The Scarlet Plague” is an epidemic novel and the situations orient to the present pandemic. Nowadays, people’s hope has been scattered away but Pandemic literature can help them to motivate themselves to stand against the loss. Rather than lamenting on loss, one should develop hope to do better in the future.

Keywords: Loss, Hope, Pandemic Condition, The Scarlet Plague, Jack London.

Download PDF

 

5. Pandemic and Literature through Ages: A Case Study

Dr V. L. Rinawmi, Assistant Professor in the Department of English, Government Johnson College, Aizawl.


Abstract

Tracing back to the past till the present day, pandemics have affected human history in innumerable as demographically, socially, culturally, politically, financially, and biologically. The study of pandemics helps one to understand politics, socio-economic structures, and personal relationships in a broader sense. Their outbreaks span across centuries and continents. The earliest recorded pandemics such as plague raised questions about existence and human’s relations to God. Yellow fever virus which originated in Africa was brought to the western hemisphere during the slave trade era, with the first epidemic reported in 1648 in the Yucatan. This Yellow Fever led to the success of the Haitian revolution. Pandemics such as cholera, too, exposed how the industrial revolution created conditions for contagion to spread among the working class and the poor. The global influenza epidemic of 1918-1920 led to an outpouring of altruism, selflessness and self sacrifice. Throughout history, there have been people who have dealt with crises that caused untold pain and suffering. In early 2020, the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic spread globally from its outbreak in China, negatively affecting economies and industries on a global scale confining people across the globe within the four walls of their houses under lockdown and restricting their movements. In such crisis, literature takes us beyond statistics of global deaths and degree of spread to show how the crisis has affected the individual lives of those infected as well as to that of families, friends, neighbors and the community as a whole. There has been a sharp upswing in the popularity of literary works dealing with plagues, pandemics and other forms of biological crises. This in fact becomes a reminder that even the hardest times can prompt and illustrate the triumph of the human spirit as reflected in numerous literary works.

KeywordsPandemic Literature, Lockdown, Anxiety, Isolation, Vulnerability, Uncertainty.

Download PDF

 

6. Elaine Showalter’s Feminine Phase and Gender Stereotypes as Evidenced in Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight

Miss. S. R. Samlin Golda, Ph.D. Research Scholar, (Reg. No:21112144012007), PG & Research Department of English, Nazareth Margoschis College, Pillaiyanmanai, Nazareth-628617.  (Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli.)
Dr. J. Mary Stella, Research Guide & Supervisor, PG & Research Department of English
Nazareth Margoschis College, Pillaiyanmanai, Nazareth-628617.
(Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli.)


Abstract

For centuries, people have been hearing fairy tales from their childhood. Almost every fairy-tale contains a physically 'strong' man and a 'weak' woman who always needs the help of a man and this is embedded into the minds of people about its fascination for harmful masculinity and helpless feminine gender. Years have been changing yet the manifestation of such toxicity has not been changed. One such example is Meyer's novel Twilight which portrays a weak human ‘woman’ and a strong 'manly' predator who is a Vampire. Stephenie Meyer is an American novelist who gains fame all over the world after her debut novel Twilight. This novel makes a strong impact and manipulates the readers' minds that the handsome look and super-hero behaviour will be the thing one needs and not a talented mind and capability. The paper attempts to throw light on the glorifying portrayal of Elaine Showalter's First phase in feminism that is "femininity" and the gender stereotypes through the writing of Meyer's “Twilight”.

Keywords: Elaine Showalter, Stephenie Meyer, Femininity, Patriarchy, Gender Stereotypes.

Download PDF

 

7. Kamala Das and the Element of Death in her Select Writings

Dr Sirisha Iruvuri, Associate Professor of English,
Nalla Narasimha Reddy Education Society’s Group of Institutions Hyderabad,
Affiliated to JNTU Hyderabad.


Abstract

There are many people who believe death is a starting place to obtain everlasting freedom from this chaotic world and wait for their time and a chance to leave this temporary world. Writing is a channel to communicate our inner feelings and the writers describe fictional, non-fictional, real-life incidents through their writings. A few writers have projected apprehensions and inhibitions of people about the ever-ending sleep in a piece of writing. A few writers who have experienced these feelings by themselves naturally described through the characters in their stories. Among the few women writers felt death as an only source to overcome their problems, agony, existing isolation and parting from their cherished once. Kamala Das is one writer who has experienced all these feelings in her life. Hence, the article decodes Kamala Das’ use of Death in her Select writings.

Keywords: Kamala Das, Death, Poems.

Download PDF