Volume- 4, Issue-2, April 2022

 
 

1. Marxist Concerns in the Selected Works of Neel Mukherjee

Mr N. Atheesh, M.Phil Scholar, Department of English, Reg no: 20213153102203, S.T Hindu College, Nagercoil. Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University.

Thiru. M. Thanumalaya PerumalAssistant Professor, Department of English, S.T Hindu College, Nagercoil. Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University.

 


Abstract

For years, Marxist theorists have used literature as an expression to expose class struggle. Theorist interpretation has been enhancing the world, and novelists all over the world have been able to make an exposition of radicalized people through fictitious works. Many unfulfilled revolutions have occurred in India. However, the works produced are entirely a product of history, which can be analyzed by examining the material conditions of the past society. As an Indian writer, Neel Mukherjee uses his novel to protect the working class by depicting the realities of Indian society. The themes of his novels revolve around the misinterpretation of ideological thoughts, specifically communist extremism symbolized as the Naxalite movement, at the same time pathetic peasant struggles were presented. Mukherjee defines the transformation of people into radical mentalities, as well as the causes and consequences that prompted them to attempt a subaltern revolution. Although the majority of his works refer to bourgeoisie novels, the author emphasizes the significance of hegemonic Indian society. As a Bengali-born author, he has written three novels, each being an allegory of Bengali society and inspected the pulse of the lower class at ground level. Neel Mukherjee’s tension as a Marxist thinker is visible.

Keywords: Naxalbari Uprising, Communist Party, India, Neel Mukherjee, West Bengal.

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2. Inclusion of Life Skills in English Literature

Ms S. JessyScholar, Alagappa University College of Education, Karaikudi.
Dr J. JayachithraResearch Guide, Alagappa University College of Education, Karaikudi.


Abstract

Life skills are necessary for students of the twenty-first century. Graduate students are good at obtaining grades and ranks, but job opportunities tend to be scarce. Even though they are proficient in their subject matter, they lack the skills and qualities required for employability. Students should also develop their character qualities, such as their attitude and behaviour. We have a lot to teach our students not just in literacy, but also in life skills. According to the current situation, today's young brains do not take their lives seriously or properly care for themselves or maintain a healthy connection with their family, instructors, friends, and even neighbours. The instructor is the best individual to shape their thoughts and keep them on track. Literature may assist to address these injustices by teaching life skills and educating them to work and contribute to society.

Keywords: Life skills, literature, English language, attitude, and employable.

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3. World of Culture Changes when Nature becomes our Teacher: An Eco-Critical Approach to the Movie Barbie of Swan Lake

Ms S. KogilaPhD. Scholar in English Literature, Department of English, School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, SASTRA Deemed to be University, Thanjavur.

Dr Sujatha A MenonResearch Supervisor, Senior Assistant Professor, Department of English, School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, SASTRA Deemed to be University, Thanjavur.

 


Abstract

“Nature never did betray The Heart that Loved her” as William Wordsworth said nature holds the power of Love, harmony, and prosperity. As we see, it changes the shape but at last, it will teach us the reality. As a teacher and a mother, Nature never separates us; as a child and students, they are doing as they wish. But nature has its way to teach or guiding the right path for beings. Once upon a time, this bond between the teacher(nature) and the student communities (humans, non-humans) was beautiful and fruitful. This fruit-bearing season changes when human moves toward rationality. “a commitment to rationalism, the view that reason (or rationality) is not only the hallmark of being human; it is what makes humans superior to nonhuman animals and nature (Warren 2009)” but the battle never be drawn. The wisest and noblest teacher never fails to win and teaches in the same way nature wins the match as well as teaches the Human. In this paper, the researcher attempts to bring out the characteristics of Nature as a teacher in all aspects through the movie Barbie of Swan Lake (2003) directed by Owen Hurley. This nature class happens in the Forest, a library of all creatures. Thus, this paper portrays the place of Peace, Wisdom, and Love and illustrates, “Let Nature be our teacher” through the characters from the forest such as Fairy Queen, Elves, and Unicorn. Through this, the forest teaches us the quality of being to Odette, Daniel and their Families- the representatives of Human beings.

Keywords: Forest, Human as a Rationalist, Nature, Teacher.

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4. The Ascendancy of Ernest Hemingway's Novel "For Whom the Bell Tolls" on Petro Marko's Novels

Mary Siniya M. V., PhD. Research Scholar, Department of English, St. Peter’s Institute of Higher Education and Research, Avadi, Chennai-54.
Dr S Uma Maheswari, Supervisor, Professor, and Head, Department of English, St. Peter’s Institute of Higher Education and Research, Avadi, Chennai-54.


Abstract

The recognition of Hemingway's translated works in Albanian literature and culture had begun in 1957, and it reached to peak in the last decade of the twentieth century. In all probability, Hemingway's works in Albanian literature were received with comfort, curiosity, respect, admiration, and enthusiasm both by readers and literary critics. In addition to the reception there are track down and proof that Hemingway in his novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls” had instigated Petro Marko to write the novel “Hasta la Vista”. This is anticipated to the actuality that the twain writers had gone to volunteer to brawl in Spain, for the world wars. Withal, they lined up in different brigades, Petro Marko in the XII Brigade and Ernest Hemingway in the XV Brigade. Both novels have similar themes, motifs, symbols, conflicts, events, and styles. Therefore, using qualitative and comparative literature methods this article will attempt to shed light on the impact of Ernest Hemingway's novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls” on Petro Marko’s novel “Hasta la Vista”. The paper concludes, that when Hemingway recounted his experience in the Spanish Civil War in his novel “For Whom the Bell Tolls” and after the Albanian writer, Petro Marko read his novel and had direct contact with Ernest Hemingway, he wrote his novel “Hasta la Vista” under Hemingway’s influence. As a result, Petro Marko’s novel is quite similar to Hemingway’s novel though there are differences, as well.

Keywords: Comparative literature, American and Albanian literature, direct influence., Jack London.

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5. Six-Word Novels: Their Evolution and Exploitation in Language Teaching

Dr S. Parvathavarthinim, Assistant Professor, Department of English, Alagappa Chettiar College of Engineering & Technology, Karaikudi.


Abstract

The English language is the most sought after language in the present day scenario, especially for engineers. In technical institutions language is taught by adopting Communicative Language Teaching and Task-Based Learning methodology. Language is learnt through various tasks in technical contexts. When these are taught in a more general context the response is better. Hence the paper aims at teaching language through a different context to the engineering students. Further, in a fast-moving world that survives through social media and the internet, an attempt has been made to pull out a genre that is prevalent in social media. The study is on employing Six-Word novels to teach the English language to engineering students.

Keywords:Six-Word Novels, Evolution and Exploitation, Language Teaching.

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6. The Recursive Spectre of Violence: Memory, Trauma and Time - A Study of Waryam Singh Sandhu’s “Shadows” (1998)

Robin Singh Arya, P.G Scholar, Ashoka University, NH 44, Rajiv Gandhi Education City, Sonipat, Haryana.


Abstract

Is an act of violence an isolated disruption in normalcy that can be neatly cordoned off in time, or is it a far-more pervasive current of agony that exceeds any such temporal demarcation? Is it possible to characterise a traumatic incident as an “event” in the past, or does it demand an acknowledgement of how the suffering of the past lives on in the present? Set against the backdrop of the Khalistan insurgency in the Punjab of the 1980s and 1990s, Waryam Singh Sandhu’s short story “Shadows” (Parchchhavein) details the rampant bloodshed of the time that also carries within itself the inevitable ring of the events of the Partition in and around 1947. In the present essay, I wish to investigate the representation of violence in “Shadows” that demands to be understood not merely as an “event” with neat temporal borders but as a constituent of the numerous and recurrent waves of violence that both constitute and disrupt the collective psyche. All along with this exploration, I focus on the strategic narrative techniques that the text employs to convey the horror of violence to the readers and the subsequent lasting impact that it leaves on its characters. By drawing upon memory as a theoretical category, I argue that memory serves a paradoxical function in the text: while the resurfacing of traumatic memories of the 1940s is painful and agonising in the face of the events of the 1980s, the amorphous nature of memory also opens up avenues where possibilities of collective catharsis and healing might lie. The curious tension between remedial hermeneutics and the recurrent surges of violence in “Shadows” ultimately resolves itself with the victory of the latter, as violence establishes itself not merely as a disruptive “event” but as the pervasive state of being in the world itself.

Keywords: Recursive Violence, Memory, Trauma, Time, Waryam Singh Sandhu, Shadows.

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